Tag Archives | pesticides

Pesticide Stewardship Partnership

The Clackamas Basin Pesticide Stewardship Partnership

The Clackamas River provides drinking water for 300,000 people, recreation for thousands, and safe harbor for endangered fish to spawn, rear and migrate. The Clackamas Basin Pesticide Stewardship Partnership (Clackamas PSP) is a voluntary, collaborative process to protect the river and its tributaries. Local and state organizations offer water quality monitoring, resources and training for landowners and managers to enable more efficient and effective pesticide use that reduces drift and runoff.

Clackamas river, photo courtesy Clackamas River Basin Council

Clackamas River,
photo courtesy Clackamas River Basin Council

Pesticides of Concern

Since 2000, water monitoring has detected pesticides in Clackamas River tributaries that exceed benchmarks to protect fish and invertebrates. Since 2005, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has monitored four sites on tributaries to the lower Clackamas River for pesticides:

  • Noyer Creek
  • North Fork Deep Creek (two locations)
  • Rock Creek
  • Sieben Creek

Pesticide active ingredients and common trade names of pesticides found in the Clackamas Basin at high levels or frequencies of concern include:

  • simazine: Princep
  • chlorpyrifos: Yuma and Lorsban Advanced
  • bifenthrin: Capture 2EC, Brigade 2EC, Brigade WSB, Wisdom
  • diuron: Karmex, Direx
  • oxyfluorfen: Goal 2XL, Goal Tender
  • chlorothaloni: Bravo Weather Stik, Chloronil 720
  • dichlobenil: Casoron
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Fact Sheet Feb 2015
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Fact Sheet Feb 2015
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Fact Sheet_ Feb 2015 Revision_1-29-15.pdf
680.0 KB
48 Downloads
Details...

Voluntary Steps in a PSP

  1. Monitor water quality to identify pesticides of concern (approaching or above unsafe levels, or found at high frequencies).
  2. Share and explain water quality monitoring results with those who are interested in protecting the quality of local streams and rivers.
  3. Engage pesticide users and technical assistance providers to identify and implement voluntary solutions to reduce pesticide drift, runoff, and waste.
  4. Use long-term water quality monitoring to measure success in reducing pesticides of concern and evaluate the effectiveness of strategies.
Sprayer calibration and smart sprayer technology dramatically reduces off-target pesticide loss. Photo by Jason Faucera

Sprayer calibration and smart sprayer technology dramatically reduces off-target pesticide loss.
Photo by Jason Faucera

Why Pesticide Stewardship Partnerships?

For Oregon

Healthy drinking water. Clean rivers. Native salmon. Abundant wildlife. Safe fish to eat.

For business

More efficient operations. Money saved through waste reduction. Reduced risk of regulation, environmental clean-ups, and negative health effects. Community-based knowledge, not “one-size-fits-all” fixes.

For best practice pest management

Integrated pest management principles ensure efficient, appropriate use of pesticides. Preventing pests, using pesticides only when necessary, and using the least pest control chemicals to be effective help prevent off-target movement of pesticides where they are not useful and can be harmful.

In the Hood River, the Dalles, and Walla Walla watersheds, collaborative partnerships reduced concentrations of pesticides and herbicides of concern in local streams by 90.

In the Hood River, the Dalles, and Walla Walla watersheds, collaborative partnerships reduced concentrations of pesticides and herbicides of concern in local streams by 90 %.

An Oregon-Grown Win-Win Strategy

Oregon’s Pesticide Stewardship Partnerships (PSPs) began in the Hood River basin and have expanded to seven watersheds in the Willamette and Columbia River Basins.

Partners have included local landowners, grower groups, watershed councils, soil and water conservation districts, water provides, Department of Environmental Quality, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Oregon State University, tribes, Oregon Environmental Council, and several other nonprofit organizations.

Providing technical resources and water testing to local experts, these partnerships have resulted in locally led initiatives that improve pest management efficiency and create measurable environmental improvements.

 Documents

Clackamas PSP Update Report April 2016
Clackamas PSP Update Report April 2016
Clackamas-PSP-Update-4-2016.pdf
Version: April 2016
1.2 MB
17 Downloads
Details...
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Fact Sheet Feb 2015
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Fact Sheet Feb 2015
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Fact Sheet_ Feb 2015 Revision_1-29-15.pdf
680.0 KB
48 Downloads
Details...
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Overview presentation
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Overview presentation
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Overview_Nursery Workshop Feb 2015.pdf
1.8 MB
16 Downloads
Details...
Clackamas PSP Summary August 2015
Clackamas PSP Summary August 2015
Clackamas PSP Summary 19August2015.pdf
Version: August 2015
1.1 MB
14 Downloads
Details...

Questions

Lisa Kilders, Clackamas County Soil and Water Conservation District 503-210-6002

Kevin Masterson, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality 541-633-2005

Cheryl McGinnis, Clackamas River Basin Council 503-303-4372

Links of Interest

Oregon Inter-agency Water Quality Pesticide Management Team

Oregon’s Pesticide Stewardship Program

Chemical Control for Insect Pests

Biological Control of Insect Pests

Proceedings of the North American Root Weevil Conference

Clackamas Pesticide Stewardship Partnership Members

We are all part of the solution – Join us!

CRBC extra smallClackamas River Basin Council
CRWP Logo extra smClackamas River Water Providers
osulogo extra smNorth Willamette Research and Education Center, Oregon State University
IPPCIntegrated Plant Protection Center
CSWCD logo extra smallClackamas County Soil and Water Conservation District
PrintOregon Environmental Council
DEQlogo smOregon Department of Environmental Quality
oda_color_extra smOregon Department of Agriculture

 

 

 

Clackamas PSP Monitoring Summary Feb 2015
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Summary Feb 2015
Clackamas PSP Monitoring Fact Sheet_ Feb 2015 Revision_1-29-15(2).pdf
680.0 KB
8 Downloads
Details...
Clackamas PSP Summary August 2015
Clackamas PSP Summary August 2015
Clackamas PSP Summary 19August2015.pdf
Version: August 2015
1.1 MB
14 Downloads
Details...
Clackamas PSP Update Report April 2016
Clackamas PSP Update Report April 2016
Clackamas-PSP-Update-4-2016.pdf
Version: April 2016
1.2 MB
17 Downloads
Details...