2020 Wildfire Resources

Wildfire Resources

Learn how you can reduce wildfire risk on your property.

There are many resources available to people affected by the recent wildfires in Clackamas County.

The Clackamas Soil and Water Conservation District would like to express its sincere gratitude to all of the fire fighters around the district and across the state who are or have been engaged in the wildfire deployments. Thank you!

The wildfires we have experienced have been devastating. To bring resources to one, easy to navigate location, we have begun compiling links to various sites, checklists and articles.

Our hearts are with all those affected.

How to Apply for Federal Disaster Aid: Individuals and business owners who sustained losses in the designated areas can begin applying for assistance by registering online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 1-800-621-3362 or 1-800-462-7585 TTY. You are encouraged to apply as soon as possible.

What to Expect Upon Returning Home: Clackamas County Disaster Management has put together a comprehensive guide called Returning to Your Home: A Guide for the 2020 Clackamas County Wildfires. This guide covers everything from tips for working with insurance companies to coping with trauma.

What to Do if You Don’t Qualify for FEMA or Rent Property Lost in a Fire:  The Oregon Law Center put together Information for Renters Affected by Oregon Wildfires. If you rented an apartment, a house, or space for a manufactured home and your housing was affected by the wildfire, this information is for you. More information about how to get help is available at
wildfire.oregon.gov and at OregonLawHelp.org.

How to Restore Your Land After a Forest Fire: Oregon Department of Forestry offers information and resources to landowners including timber salvage FAQs, replanting and seeing information, and details about the Emergency Forest Restoration Program online at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/fire/Pages/afterafire.aspx.

How to Replace Vital Records Lost in a Wildfire:  The Center for Health Statistics has issued temporary rules to waive fees for people who have experienced loss of property or life associated with the wildfires. See answers to frequently asked questions and learn how to order copies and apply for the waiver on the State Vital Records website.

How to Safely Manage Ash and Debris from Burned Buildings: The State of Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) offers tips and resources to landowners dealing with ash and fire debris on their property as well as how to approach demolition and rebuilding after a wildfire. Locate links and phone numbers here.

How to Manage Debris Removal on a Property: Sign up by Oct. 16, 2020 for the State of Oregon and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to pay for the removal of household hazardous waste on your property affected by the wildfires. Landowners must sign a Right-of-entry form by October 16 to allow access to their property for the identification and removal of hazardous substances for safe disposal. Find more information about clearing debris and the Right-of-entry form at www.clackamas.us/wildfires/clear-debris.

Why You Should Avoid Leaf Blowers During Clean Up: Wildfire smoke contains fine particulate matter which is particularly dangerous for human health (see the EPA’s Wildfire Smoke Guide). Protect Yourself From Ash provides tips to limit your exposure from toxins found in ash both indoor and out after a fire.

How to Assess and Manage Water Quality Concerns After a Wildfire:  The Oregon Post-Wildfire Flood Playbook provides links and information on potential changes to water quality after a wildfire. DEQ also offers additional information and resources on its Source Water Protection website.

How to Prevent Erosion on Lands Affected by Wildfire:  During the fall and winter after a fire, rain on bare soil can cause the soil to erode and run
off. The Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) has created a 2-page document entitled Protecting Your Soils After a Fire for landowners/managers with information about erosion control after wildfire. The Natural Resources Conservation Service also has detailed After the Fire Factsheets that address many types of erosion control measures and provides information on reseeding and restoration.

How to Locate Animals Displaced Due to Wildfire: ODA has created an online database and website to help called ODA Animal Track. This resource is meant to assist Oregonians looking for animals displaced during the wildfires. This tracker is not intended to replace existing systems already in place at county animal shelters.

How to Care for Livestock After a Wildfire: The Oregon State University Small Farms Program has put together a list of resources on their Small Farms, Local Food, and Wildfires page. Information includes care for horses, cattle, other farm animals and pets.

Clackamas County Farmers and Livestock Producers: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has technical and financial assistance available to help farmers, livestock producers and private forest landowners recover. Contact the local USDA Service Center to report losses and learn more about program options available to assist in their recovery from crop, land, infrastructure and livestock losses and damages. Details about the many disaster assistance programs available from USDA can be found on the Natural Resources Conservation Website.

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